Understanding Image size and resolution

Pixel dimensions measure the total number of pixels along an image’s width and height. Resolution is the fineness of detail in a bitmap image and is measured in pixels per inch (ppi). The more pixels per inch, the greater the resolution. Generally, an image with a higher resolution produces a better printed image quality.

Photoshop pixel dimensions and printed image resolution
Same image at 72‑ppi and 300‑ppi; inset zoom 200%


Unless an image is resampled (see Resampling), the amount of image data remains constant as you change either the print dimensions or resolution. For example, if you change the resolution of a file, its width and height change accordingly to maintain the same amount of image data.
In Photoshop, you can see the relationship between image size and resolution in the Image Size dialog box (choose Image > Image Size). Deselect Resample Image, because you don’t want to change the amount of image data in your photo. Then change width, height, or resolution. As you change one value, the other two values change accordingly. With the Resample Image option selected, you can change the resolution, width, and height of the image to suit your printing or onscreen needs.
Photoshop Pixel dimensions
Pixel dimensions equal document (output) size times resolution.

A. Original dimensions and resolution B. Decreasing the resolution without changing pixel dimensions (no resampling) C.Decreasing the resolution at same document size decreases pixel dimensions (resampling). 

Quickly display the current image size


If you want to quickly display a document’s current image size, use the information box at the bottom of the document window. Position the pointer over the file information box, and hold down the mouse button.

File size


The file size of an image is the digital size of the image file, measured in kilobytes (K), megabytes (MB), or gigabytes (GB). File size is proportional to the pixel dimensions of the image. Images with more pixels may produce more detail at a given printed size, but they require more disk space to store and may be slower to edit and print. Image resolution thus becomes a compromise between image quality (capturing all the data you need) and file size.
Another factor that affects file size is file format. Because of the varying compression methods used by GIF, JPEG, PNG, and TIFF file formats, file sizes can vary considerably for the same pixel dimensions. Similarly, color bit-depth and the number of layers and channels in an image affect file size.
Photoshop supports a maximum pixel dimension of 300,000 by 300,000 pixels per image. This restriction places limits on the print size and resolution available to an image.

About monitor resolution


Your monitor’s resolution is described in pixel dimensions. For example, if your monitor resolution and your photo’s pixel dimensions are the same size, the photo will fill the screen when viewed at 100%. How large an image appears on‑screen depends on a combination of factors—the pixel dimensions of the image, the monitor size, and the monitor resolution setting. In Photoshop, you can change the image magnification on‑screen, so you can easily work with images of any pixel dimensions.
Photoshop monitor resolution
A 620‑ by 400‑pixel image displayed on monitors of various sizes and resolutions.


When preparing images for viewing on‑screen, you should consider the lowest monitor resolution that your photo is likely to be viewed on.

About printer resolution


Printer resolution is measured in ink dots per inch, also known as dpi. Generally, the more dots per inch, the finer the printed output you’ll get. Most inkjet printers have a resolution of approximately 720 to 2880 dpi. (Technically, inkjet printers produce a microscopic spray of ink, not actual dots like imagesetters or laser printers.)
Printer resolution is different from, but related to image resolution. To print a high quality photo on an inkjet printer, an image resolution of at least 220 ppi should provide good results.
Screen frequency is the number of printer dots or halftone cells per inch used to print grayscale images or color separations. Also known as screen ruling or line screen, screen frequency is measured in lines per inch (lpi)—or lines of cells per inch in a halftone screen. The higher the resolution of the output device, the finer (higher) a screen ruling you can use.
The relationship between image resolution and screen frequency determines the quality of detail in the printed image. To produce a halftone image of the highest quality, you generally use an image resolution that is from 1.5 to at most 2 times the screen frequency. But with some images and output devices, a lower resolution can produce good results. To determine your printer’s screen frequency, check your printer documentation or consult your service provider.
Note: 
Some imagesetters and 600‑dpi laser printers use screening technologies other than halftoning. If you are printing an image on a nonhalftone printer, consult your service provider or your printer documentation for the recommended image resolutions.
Photoshop Screen frequency examples
Screen frequency examples

A. 65 lpi: Coarse screen typically used to print newsletters and grocery coupons B. 85 lpi: Average screen typically used to print newspapers C. 133 lpi: High-quality screen typically used to print four-color magazines D. 177 lpi: Very fine screen typically used for annual reports and images in art books 

Determine a suggested resolution for an image


If you plan to print your image using a halftone screen, the range of suitable image resolutions depends on the screen frequency of your output device. Photoshop can determine a recommended image resolution based on the screen frequency of your output device.
Note: 
If your image resolution is more than 2.5 times the screen ruling, an alert message appears when you try to print the image. This means that the image resolution is higher than necessary for the printer. Save a copy of the file, and then reduce the resolution.



  1. Choose Image > Image Size.

  2. Click Auto.

  3. For Screen, enter the screen frequency for the output device. If necessary, choose a different unit of measurement. Note that the screen value is used only to calculate the image resolution, not to set the screen for printing.

  4. For Quality, select an option:

    Draft
    Produces a resolution that is the same as the screen frequency (no lower than 72 pixels per inch).

    Good
    Produces a resolution 1.5 times the screen frequency.

    Best
    Produces a resolution 2 times the screen frequency.

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